Cupernham Infant School

Together we care, we learn and we enjoy SUCCESS!

Pupil Premium

From April 2011 all schools have received funding known as Pupil Premium. Pupil Premium is additional funding allocated to support pupils in school who are in receipt of Free School Meals (FSM).

Pupil Premium Strategy 2016-2017

1. Summary information
School Cupernham Infant School * As a growing school we are funded for 246 children for 2016-17
Academic Year 2016-17 Total PP budget £35,780 Date of most recent PP Review December 2016
Total number of pupils 267 * Number of pupils eligible for PP 17 Date for next internal review of this strategy February 2017
2. Current attainment
Pupils eligible for PP (your school) Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)
% achieving in reading, writing and maths 49.2% (14 pupils) 71.6% (tbc)
% making progress in reading 71.40% 89%
% making progress in writing 71.40% 85%
% making progress in maths 50% 83%
3. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)
In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)
A. Low oral and communication skills in addition to children lacking in wider experiences to make connections
B. Correlation between pupils eligible for PP and PSED skills development – fundamental for readiness for learning
C. Children lack confidence in applying writing skills - phonic application, sustaining writing independently
D. Children lack confidence in applying reading skills - reading regularly, phonic/reading strategy application and discussing their reading
E. Children lack fluency in number and need enrichment concrete practical experience to develop and apply calculation strategies confidently and independently
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
F. Multi agency –especially children’s services involvement with 10 out of 17 families- we are seeking wider parenting and home support
G. Parental engagement has in the past been a barrier to keep parents confidently involved
4. Desired outcomes
Desired outcomes and how they will be measured Success criteria
A.
B.
Improved oral skills especially in YR. Increase confidence and engagement, though nurturing and developing children’s ability to have own ideas, take ownership, articulate thinking and make links in their learning. Y1 and Y2 - Enhanced oral skills increasing impact on learning progress and independent learning (Pupil Conferencing/Lesson Obs).
Increase in Closer to/ARE at end of Year.
YR - Higher % of PP children achieving ELGs in PRIME.
C. Improved gross and fine motor skills and writing skills and improve ability to sustain writing independently through increasing confidence and resilience. Higher % of PP children attaining ELG in Literacy Writing (progress dep).
Higher % of PP children Exceeding – over time based on progress.
Higher % of PP children achieving ARE in writing Y1 and Y2.
Progress rate inline or near to Non PP.
Monitor Confidence and Resilience – Work Sampling/Pupil Conferencing
D. Improved confidence in application of reading strategies increasing independence, fluency and comprehension Higher % of PP children attaining ELG in Literacy Reading. (20% Y1).
Higher % of PP children Exceeding Higher % of PP children achieving.
ARE in Progress Y1 and Y2.
Progress rate inline or near to Non PP.
Monitor Confidence and Resilience – GR observations, Reading Record sampling/Pupil Conferencing.
Progress rate inline or near to Non PP.
E. Improved mental maths, fluency and attitude to impact on learning progress in maths, identifying and targeting conceptual gaps. Higher % of PP children attaining ELG in number (progress checks).
Higher % of PP children Exceeding -25% YR.
Higher % of PP children achieving ARE / GD in Y1(40%) and Y2 (80%).
Increase GD by end of Year 2 –over time progress check dependent.
Progress rate inline or near to Non PP.
F. Effective Multi-agency support for wider family needs.
Ongoing, proactive involvement – HT, SENCo, Early Help Hub, Children’s Services etc.
Evidence of reduced tier of need.
Parent feedback
G. Increased level of engagement in school for all PP parents/carers.
Support involvement in extra-curricular activities promoting health and well-being.
Increase attendance at a range of enrichment and information giving events of parent/carer of PP children.
Parent feedback.
Participation in range of clubs and extra-curricular/ enrichment activities strongly evident.
Children enthusiastic and confident about keeping healthy.
1. Planned expenditure
Academic Year 2016-2017
The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
i. Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
A and B.
Improved oral skills especially in YR. Increase confidence and engagement, though nurturing and developing children’s ability to have own ideas, take ownership, articulate thinking and make links in their learning.
  • Year group training led by year leader to develop quality of interaction and feedback during enhanced provision.
  • New staff training – Sp&L with therapist and SENCo involvement.
  • Develop oracy skills through peer support to ensure consistency especially for staff members new to cohort teams.
  • Develop consistency and rigour of provision of communication skills through SENCo LSA training by developing ELSA principles and approaches and speaking and listening in the flow of learning.
  • Proactive involvement in projects such as ‘Teaching the Hard to Teach’- refines provision across school.
  • PHSE/ PSED review and revisions throughout school.
  • We need to increase staff skills due to changes at the start of Sept 16 when experienced HLTA left.
  • We need to increase staff skills in response to changes in cohort needs of children.
  • Many evidence sources eg EEF toolkit, Health Service - suggest early intervention and high quality feedback is effective in raising attainment.
  • We want to embed such skills across school and especially in aiding transition from YR to KS1 for vulnerable children and those who did not attain GLD.
  • Sutton Trust research shows the positive impact of SEL interventions on attitudes and attainment.
  • Sutton Trust research shows the positive impact of effective feedback. Children will learn self-help strategies so as to be aware of their own learning needs and of what they need to do to be successful; boosting motivation.
  • Liaison between SP&L therapist, SENCo and YR Leader.
  • Follow up Health Service training by YR Leader and SP&L therapist input by SENCo.
  • Dedicated training time for staff with SENCo
  • Peer coaching, observation and support to spread best practice.
  • Regular half termly reviews of provision SEN/ AEN/ vulnerable groups is effectively followed up through staff & cohort meetings
  • Development –specialist EKLAN accredited training principles applied to general class contexts.
  • As above – for THOMAS training.
SENCO and SLT
SEN/AEN team support
Cohort Leaders
February
April
June

Milestone analysis and SIP5 tracking-evaluation.
Governor monitoring & strategic reviews.
C.
Improved gross and fine motor skills and writing skills in YR. Develop ability to sustain writing independently through increasing confidence and resilience in KS1.
  • Whole school review of new curriculum with increased ambition EoY benchmarks to improve children’s skills, especially Y2: spelling, SPaG, transcriptional skills.
  • Continue to develop a creative cross curriculum providing children with engaging and purposeful opportunities for writing.
  • Monitoring of teaching and learning confirms richness of creative cross curricular learning however national curriculum revisions combined with changing cohort require whole school adaptation of provision with a focus on transcriptional skills.
  • Peer observation and support to spread best practice.
  • Lesson Observations
  • Book scrutiny
  • Data analysis- SLT
HT, DHT SLT and core Team February
April
June
D.
Improved confidence in application of reading strategies to independence, fluency and comprehension.

Increased enjoyment and reading for pleasure and broader reading range to secure regular reading habit including home.
  • School review with increased ambition EoY benchmarks
  • Increase teaching focus of decoding in Guided Reading
  • Increase phonic application
  • Increase range of reading experiences especially for vulnerable learners- library clubs, paired/buddy reading opportunities, library visits
  • FFT intervention principles explained & understood to maximise progress.
  • Improve reading resources.
  • Further phonics resources
  • Monitoring of teaching and learning confirms richness of creative cross curricular learning, however, national curriculum revisions combined with changing cohort require whole school adaptation of provision in reading.
  • Despite improvement in phonic screening outcomes, fluency holds children back so both provision and specific resourcing will be carefully monitored for impact.
  • Actions evaluations/ revisions conveyed in School Improvement Priority
  • Peer observation and support to spread best practice.
  • Lesson Observations
  • Reading diary/reading record scrutiny
  • Data analysis
HT, DHT SLT and core Team February
April
June
E.
Improved mental maths, fluency and attitude to impact on learning progress in maths
  • Following last year’s INSET, there is a need for time to embed and apply changes made to delivery especially to task design and increase opportunities for children to consolidate and extend mathematical thinking.
  • Continue to develop and increase time dedicated to mental maths skills
  • Additional reinforcement in groups, 1:1 overlearning.
  • Monitoring of teaching and learning confirms richness of creative cross curricular learning
  • however
  • national curriculum revisions combined with changing cohort require whole school adaptation of pedagogy and provision.
  • Peer observation and support to spread best practice.
  • Lesson Observations
  • Reading diary/reading record scrutiny
  • Data analysis
HT, DHT SLT and core Team February
April
June
Total budgeted cost £15,600
ii. Targeted support
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
A and B.
Improved oral skills especially in YR. Increase confidence and engagement, though nurturing and developing children’s ability to have own ideas, take ownership, articulate thinking and make links in their learning
  • Introduce and develop YR Nurture, Social and Language Enrichment Groups
  • Continue to use ELSA to support Y1 and Y2 children
  • Confidence Boosting Groups in Year 1
  • 1:1 & small groups to develop metacognition, emotional awareness & social skills.
  • ELSA adaptions and links to whole school emotional literacy supports
  • Additional clubs – like Lego Club
  • 1:1 reviews with teachers
  • Sp&L training –all LSAs & specialist training –links between speech & autism/ behavioural issues.
  • Further ELSA development and training
  • Data analysis – PP cf with non-PP -+ 4% difference (96%+ EoY targets-YR)
  • The impact of last year’s additional support & Sp&L programmes in YR with a focus on enrichment and language development.
  • Evidence from ‘growth mindset’ research shows the positive impact of liberating and empowering all children to know they can enjoy success (a core part of our school values system).
  • It is evident that carefully structured contexts for collaborative learning enhance learning progress but the behaviours and routines need to be carefully developed- as reinforced through these additional group activities.
  • Monitoring teaching
  • Review impact
  • Data Analysis with a focus on Language and Communication skills
  • Impact analysis using Boxall Profiles
  • Ongoing review at each ‘milestone’ to check impact of provision
  • Parent liaison and feedback
SENCO
HT
February
April
June
C.
Improved gross and fine motor skills and writing skills in YR and Y1 and improve ability to sustain writing independently through increasing confidence and resilience in Y1 and Y2.
  • YR Targeted Fine and Gross Motor enrichment
  • Y1 Tricky words development
  • FFT adapted programme provision where applicable
  • Quality feedback & periodic 1:1 response time with a teacher to boost progress.
  • Resourcing and supports for cursive handwriting
  • Data analysis – PP compared with non-PP 97% CF 87% EoY predictions YR)
  • Increased % of children having difficulties with transcriptional skills
  • Essential prerequisite of Fine and Gross Motor co-ordination following OT ABC assessment.
  • The value of goal focused outcomes boosts effort and an affirmation of progress
  • Application of OT training in 2014.
  • OT programmes adapted for individuals
  • Monitor OT assessments
  • Teacher feedback and evaluation post data ‘milestones’
SENCO
HT
February
April
June
D.
Improved confidence in application of reading strategies to improve independence, fluency and comprehension.

Increased enjoyment and reading for pleasure and broader reading range to secure regular reading habit including home
  • YR- Introduction of Focus group additional reading session weekly
  • Y1 Introduction of additional weekly teacher led Guided Reading sessions
  • Small Group teacher led Phonic sessions –
  • Introduction of additional Guided Reading sessions 1 x weekly
  • Adapted provision and additional 1:1 reading opportunities where possible
  • Data analysis – PP compared with non-PP (92% cf 90% EoY target-YR)
  • Increase in Guided Reading sessions as a result of monitoring of teaching and learning in Guided Reading showing positive impact
  • Adaptations to FFT programme to impact more children
  • Alterations of Guided Reading groups/ practise to focus on decoding and reading strategies specific to ‘weak’ areas from wraps analysis
  • Monitoring teaching
  • Review impact
  • Data Analysis – Wraps/ tracking
  • Teacher feedback and evaluation post data ‘milestones’
SENCO
HT
February
April
June
E.
Improved mental maths, fluency and attitude to impact on learning progress in maths
  • Year R – extended number support
  • Year 1 – Maths intervention 1xweekly
  • Enhanced provision - maths challenge time with HT.
  • Year 2 – First Class in number -
  • Year 1 Summer Term – Maths Intervention (1st Class or other such as pre-teach strategies)
  • Data analysis – PP compared with non-PP 90 cf 92% EoY targets in YR
  • Observations and Teacher assessment indicates lack of fluency is inhibiting progress and attainment
  • Monitoring teaching
  • Pupil/Teacher conferencing
  • Review impact
  • Data Analysis – Wraps/ tracking
  • Teacher feedback and evaluation post data ‘milestones’
SENCO
HT
February
April
June
Total budgeted cost £14,300
iii. Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
A and B.
Improved oral skills especially in YR. Increase confidence and engagement, though nurturing and developing children’s ability to have own ideas, take ownership, articulate thinking and make links in their learning
  • Increase Enrichment opportunities, small group responsibilities, conversations and scaffolds to develop links with learning
  • Talk time & social group supports
  • Enrichment Project linked to local area eg shop/library visits
  • Past evidence and research shows how vital developing self-esteem, self-confidence, communications skills and forums for connecting learning with their appreciation of the wider world is
  • Planning and preparation time
  • Child led focus
  • Carefully thought groups
  • Children’s involvement
  • Dedicated learning time
  • Pupil Conferencing
March
June
C.
Improved gross and fine motor skills and writing skills in YR and improve ability to sustain writing independently through increasing confidence and resilience in Y1 and Y2.
  • Y1 and 2 - Provide opportunities through personal, real life contexts for purposeful writing
  • Enrichment Project linked to local area eg. Shop, Cook club with writing focus
  • Additional weekly writing intervention in Year 1
  • Personalised supports for independent writing
  • Past evidence and research shows how vital developing self-esteem, self-confidence, communications skills and forums for connecting learning with their appreciation of the wider world is
  • Writing interventions
  • OT evidence of the importance of core strength development
  • Planning and preparation time
  • Child led focus
  • Carefully thought groups
  • Children’s involvement
  • Dedicated learning time
  • Pupil Conferencing
March
June
D.
Improved confidence in application of reading strategies to independence, fluency and comprehension.

Increased enjoyment and reading for pleasure and broader reading range to secure regular reading habit including home
Winter Warmer and enrichment library activities
Spring Term
Providing a book to take home
Library Club (lunchtimes)
Increased enjoyment, increased reading for pleasure and broader reading range to secure regular reading habit including home Y2
Enrichment library activities (Jan 17)
Visit to Local Library with parents invited to share experience
  • Past evidence showed very positive responses to Winter Warmer sessions
  • Previous library visits have been positive. However, can see a huge value in introducing and encouraging parents to form links with the library to share with them the wide range of activities available at the library e.g. LetsGo Construction Club
  • Planned Winter Warmer sessions
  • Parents of invited children personally approached by class teachers, encourage children to attend with book gift
March
June
E.
Improved mental maths, fluency and attitude to impact on learning progress in maths
  • Summer Maths Challenge – conversation with parents. Encourage involvement in maths workshops etc,
  • Introduction of maths games Swap Shop (made resource/bought games/ dedicated ICT opportunities) for home learning, increasing enjoyment of maths. Use a club structure to introduce and swap games
  • High % of children took part in Summer Maths Challenge, however, high proportion of PP/vulnerable children did not take part
  • Analyse of children needs - encourage parents to support children’s maths skills at home using games which may not be available to the children in the home setting
  • Carefully resourced games
  • ‘Swap shop’ club and system introduced to children in school initially, then developed so games will go home
March
June
F.
Increased level of engagement in school for all PP parents/carers.
  • Home Maths Game ‘Swap Shop’ initiative
  • Outdoor Games Swap Shop
  • Future Parenting Support Programme – Incredible Years delivered by SENCO with involvement of other teachers
  • Story Sacks Swap Shop
  • Curriculum Workshops – literacy/numeracy, personalised targeted invite and follow up
  • YR – Home visits, sensitive transition, building trusting relationships for informal communications
  • Tapestry supports maximised (sharing times to use tapestry)
  • Continued support for periodic funding to attend clubs and enrichment activities.
  • Training of SENCo –Incredible Years programme, funding for resources and liaison with local Family Support Service to establish sustainable and effective provision- aim to start by April 2017.
  • Analyse of children’s needs - encourage parents to become increasingly involved in the children’s learning in school and at home.
  • Evidence from Sports Funding- impact of healthy living and positivity on learning progress and overall wellbeing.
  • Accessibility to extra-curricular activities to motivate, inspire and boost the confidence of children and their families.
  • Families start to engage more fully with school activities
  • There is a strong need for effective parenting support programmes as well as access to ad-hoc, practical support. The closure of the Children’s Centre in Romsey places great strain on provision so we are building capacity to provide our own targeted and quality assured support (in liaison with Cupernham Junior School as this will need access to the Community hall, together with carefully planned provision in consultation with the Family Support Service)
  • Carefully resourced games
  • ‘Swap shop’ club and system introduced to children in school initially, then developed so games will go home
  • Parents personally invited to attend workshops highlighting informal structure/benefits for their children etc.
  • Parent feedback and attendance records show increased engagement and positivity.
  • Pupil conferencing
  • Teacher feedback
  • Increased involvement in fun creative events (Junk Jamboree etc) and in Healthy Habits/ Outdoor learning events (as per School Improvement Plan)
  • Careful short term review as well as strategic planning for further effective support (such as providing accessible parenting programmes)
March
June
G.
Responsive support for hardship and to enable participation in wider activities and events, including extended day and sports clubs, the provision of uniform and funding for school trips.
  • Flexible and sensitive support to enable periodic or routine attendance at extended day facilities.
  • Regular provision of places on after school sports clubs
  • Financial support for trips and events
  • Sensitive provision of additional uniform, PE kit etc
  • Long-standing impact of increasing inclusion
  • Attendance boosts self-esteem, well-being and enjoyment- positive feedback from parents
  • Feedback from children, staff and parents
March
June
Total budgeted cost £5,980

Pupil Premium Expenditure and Impact 2015-2016

In 2015-2016 Pupil Premium allocation was £27,860.

2015/16
Pupil premium: £27,860 Number on Roll: 227
Funding for 18. Actual number 24 as Growing School
Attainment at the end of the Foundation Stage for pupils eligible for pupil premium
2016
% achieving a GLD (good level of development) 83% (6 children)
Year 1 phonics screen – children passed
2016
% Passing Phonics Test 81% (7 children)
KS1 end of 2016 data
Children eligible for Pupil premium (11) Pupils eligible for pupil premium National All pupils (this is a comparison to reduce the gap)
% achieved Year 2 ARE
Reading 73% 75%
Writing 73% 65%
Maths 64% 73%
Pupil premium used for New or continued Summary of interventions or action Intended Outcomes Monitoring
ELSA emotional literacy supports Continued but expanded
  • Development of social skills
  • Coping strategies -resilience
  • Preparing for transition/change
  • Increased confidence in group learning
  • Improved self worth & expression
  • ELSA meetings and records based on Boxall Profile start and end comparisons
  • Feedback from the children
  • Feedback from parents
  • Feedback from class teachers- increased
Speech and Language support Continued but developed Fine tuning of programmes from S&L therapist personalised to increase expressive skills 1:1 programme Children are signed off S&L therapist programme but retain a regular individual or small group session to develop confident self-expression and range of vocabulary used
  • SENCo in liaison with LSA and HLTA
  • Feedback from S&L therapist half termly visits
  • Feedback from parents and children
  • Observations in group and class oral activities
First Class in Number Continued Apply programme but also adapt materials to provide pre-teach and consolidation to increase confidence Children able to apply learnt skills in a wide range of contexts within differentiated lessons so as to make improved progress
  • SENCo and LSA records and review
  • On-going assessments and termly data analysis of both progress and attainment
  • Review of attitude and confidence in tackling work more independently
Enrichment Clubs Continued but considerably expanded Prioritise developing confidence, self-esteem and engagement/ enjoyment through wide range of participation in all clubs and activities Provision has been more highly personalised with a very broad range of both lunchtime and after school clubs Feedback from children and their families- plus staff awareness of increase in engagement and confidence
Breakfast Club New Offer a calm and positive start to the school day and a nutritional breakfast. Children provided with learning through games and literacy/ reading activities. Children settle much more positively at the start of the school day and show greater concentration. Feedback from breakfast club staff, from teachers and from families confirms the value of provision
Working Memory Skills New
  • SENCo monitoring programme guided by EP involvement
  • Review of short term memory skills and strategies
Data tracking Developed over the year- such as through additional year group leader review time
  • Target Tracker cf FFT predictions, and analysis of individual progress
  • Half termly review of progress cf intervention s= cohort level revisions
  • Pupil Premium children are a focus for analysis.
  • Termly revisions to try an boost PP progress
Analysis highlights within year underachievement and measures are put in place to reduce this, leading to greater
  • Data monitored by SLT and also Year Group Leader analysis and review
  • Class teachers prepare and share PP review post data analysis and DHT and SENCo meet with governors to consider impact of interventions on progress
Targeted interventions Increase On-going development of interventions - ELS, Sentence Chefs writing club, daily reading, additional reading, hand gym, precision reading, tricky word support, paired reading, pre-teach maths etc etc Individual needs identified early and targeted with the most appropriate intervention to support progress
  • Rates of progress improve as measured by SENCo/ cohort level analysis of start and end progress
  • Exit assessment to compare progress and impact of intervention
Release time for teachers to work with SENCO and to review / apply advice from outside agencies such as the EP (increased visit time)
Additional EP time
On-going
  • Effective provision mapping in place with a termly review and follow up revisions
  • Re-establishing EP led programmes such as paired reading especially over long summer break
Increase teacher knowledge in the most effective provision for vulnerable learners and ensure SENCo/ EP have full and accurate picture when targeting support programmes Improvement in rates of progress for SEN and vulnerable learners so children make expected progress
Educational Inclusion On-going Funding for trips and extra curricular activities Entitlement to participate in all school activities- inclusive practice
Improve transition arrangements Enhanced Induction developed with increase focus on PP and vulnerable families- IPA plus meetings. Within school transition and information developed - such as increased workshops- maths etc.
  • Clearer and improved programme for vulnerable families including extra SENCo and year leader time
  • Targeted support pre holidays- paired reading programme and maths challenge.
Over time, staff aware that dip due to transition is in line with peers- confidence of PP and vulnerable learners increases - monitoring via year groups and SLT to SIP governors